Katsuhiko Oku

Katsuhiko Oku (1958 – 2003) and London Japanese

By Reg Clark – October 2017

068a2
Katsuhiko Oku

Katsu was born in Takarazuka in Hyogo Prefecture. He attended Itami High School where he was a prominent schoolboy rugby player in the Kansai before moving on to Waseda University where he studied politics and economics.  In his first two years at Waseda he was a member of the university rugby club and played for the 1st XV.  After a bad head injury however he didn’t play rugby in his last two years – he later said it was a blessing in disguise as he was able to concentrate on his studies, as a result of which he was successful in entering Gaimusho.  Early in his career he was sent to Hertford College, Oxford to join the university’s special two year course for international diplomats – from 1981 to 1983. At this stage we was already married, having met his future wife Emiko at Waseda.

At that point Katsu decided to take the risk of playing rugby again, as a result of which he became the first Japanese national ever to represent the Blues XV at Oxford – playing on the wing.  He was a very popular figure amongst his teammates and made many lifelong friendships at Oxford.  It was at this point that I met Katsu for the first time – I had left Oxford in 1980 to play rugby for Kobe Steel and on a business trip back to the UK in 1982 I was encouraged by my old teammates to meet him. It was the beginning of a very close and lasting friendship.

When I returned from Kobe to London in the summer of 1983, it was natural for me, via Katsu, to play for London Japanese.  I was playing club rugby for London Irish, then Richmond, in those years, but Lonjapa games were always on a Sunday and so it was possible.  My first game was in Oxford and of all of the other games I played in those days I remember a very cross-cultural fixture against Reading West Indians!  Lonjapa had been founded in 1979 by a small group  of people including Watanabe san the proprietor of Yoisho;  whilst Katsu was therefore technically not one of the actual founders, he is always regarded as one as his energy and enthusiasm on his arrival in 1981 really moved Lonjapa to a regular club rather than one playing just one or two games per year.

I look back with some nostalgia, and a little sadness, to think of the back line of the club when I first played – Hiro Shukuzawa at no 9, myself at no 10 and Katsu at number 12.  It’s incredible to think that not only those two, but also Japanese captain Ishizuka of Ricoh, my teammate for Lonjapa and also at Richmond from 1984, have all passed away.

Katsu returned to Japan in 1983 and in addition to working in Tokyo, he and his family had postings to Teheran and Washington, before he was assigned the London Embassy from 2000.  Deciding he was told old to play at this time (see leg breaking incident below), he become an enthusiastic supporter and member of both Lonjapa and the Kew Occasionals. In all the time in between his university career and arrival back in London he had worked hard as a member of the international committee of the JRFU to promote Japanese rugby internationally, and especially in later years supporting Japan’s successive bids to stage the Rugby World Cup.  It’s well known that former PM Mori, President of the JRFU, said that on hearing the news of Japan’s successful bid to stage the 2019 tournament that his first thought was of Katsu.

As we all know,  Katsu was in 2003 assigned by the Embassy in London to oversee Japan’s contribution to the UN post-was reconstruction programme in Iraq and on November 29th was tragically assassinated along with his diplomatic colleague Inoue and driver south of Tikrit. The shock for his family especially and all of his many friends was immense.  I have a vivid memory of jointly hosting a reception at the Garrick Club with the then Ambassador to honour Katsu’s memory a week later in early December, because as we met the England team were having their Rugby World Cup winning victory parade within walking distance in Trafalgar Square – a strange and striking conjunction.

The memory of the tragedy was initially too raw to contemplate any kind of further memorial, but after two years, in 2005 my friends from Lonjapa and I decided to stage a game between Kew Occasionals and London Japanese for the Katsu Oku Memorial Trophy.  It wasn’t a big occasion at first, but I will always be grateful to Ambassador Nogami for attending all of the first three events  we staged to present the trophy, no matter how small the crowd and how bad the weather and the Japanese Embassy and community generally have continued over the years to support the event.

The Oku Memorial Trophy has since then sometimes been played as a 3 or 4 team tournament including New York Japanese,  Vincent’s Club Oxford and Hertford College, either at the Richmond Athletic Ground or at Iffley Road, Oxford.  In September 2015,  Waseda played Oxford in the opening game of the World University Tournament for a new trophy presented by PM Mori,  and in May 2016 the Kew Occasionals played Waseda Old Boys for the same trophy at the Kami-igusa Ground in Tokyo.

Last year I was pleased that we went ‘back to basics’ – Lonjapa vs Kew at the Richmond Athletic Ground in early December, with Ambassador Tsuruoka honouring us with his presence.  This year we are delighted that at the same venue Hertford College, Oxford will assemble a Past & Present XV to join us in a three way tournament.

I have so many happy memories of Katsu, it’s difficult to choose between them but I will highlight two.  In 1988 I was the Manager of an Oxford University Tour to Japan and by huge luck (or was it?) Katsu was the JRFU liaison officer for the tour. We had a fantastic time together throughout the unbeaten tour until at the final training session before the final game with Japan,  the team (including All Black World Cup winning captain David Kirk, Ian Williams – later of Kobe Steel fame, and 4 other internationals) asked for Katsu and I to provide fully opposed practice. Despite my warnings poor old Katsu tore into the task with huge energy and ended up breaking his leg.  Such was his spirit however, that he attended the game the next day and saw us off at the airport, before having the surgery on his leg that he needed. My other happy memory of him is his time in London from 2000 when we spent a lot of time together, watching rugby and playing golf (with the occasional drink).  In 2002 we made a private trip to watch Oxford play Waseda in the official opening game of Waseda’s Kami-igusa training ground in Tokyo – a very memorable few days indeed.

As I say every year:  Katsu Oku was one of the finest people I ever had the privilege to know – he was energetic, talented and above all great fun to be with.  He made a massive contribution to the early development of London Japanese rugby club and to Japan’s quest to stage the Rugby World Cup and it’s entirely appropriate that we celebrate his life by playing our modest rugby matches in his memory each year.


奥克彦(1958―2003)と、ロンドンジャパニーズ

レジ・クラーク、2017年10月

068a2
奥克彦

兵庫県の宝塚に生まれたカツ(奥克彦氏)は、伊丹高校時代、関西では名の知れた選手だったと聞いている。その後、早稲田大学政治経済学部に進学し、体育会ラグビー部でプレーを続けたが、2年生の時に負った頭部への負傷を理由に退部。カツは、「今振り返れば、このお陰で勉学に集中する時間ができ、外務省に入れたのだから、人生というものは皮肉なものだ」と語っていた。外務省入りして間も無い1981年、カツはオックスフォード大学ハートフォードカレッジの、外交官向けの2年間コースに参加した。この時、既に早稲田大学で出会ったエミコさんと結婚していた。

オックスフォードへやってきたカツは、危険を承知で、ラグビーを再開。日本人として初めて、オックスフォード大学ラグビー部1軍の試合に、WTBで出場した。カツは、チームメイトの間でも人気者で、オックスフォードでは、多くの友人と生涯続く友情を築いた。

私は1980年にオックスフォード大を卒業し、カツがいた頃は神戸製鋼で働きながらラグビーをプレーしていた。1982年に出張でイギリスへ戻った際、ラグビー部の仲間から、是非ともこの日本人を紹介したい、と言われた。これが、私とカツの、その後も長く続く友情の始まりだった。

神戸での日々を終え、私がイギリスに戻ったのは、1983年。カツの紹介で、ロンドンジャパニーズでプレーするようになったのは、ごく自然な流れだった。イギリスに帰った私は、ロンドン・アイリッシュ、その後リッチモンドでプレーを続けたが、ロンジャパの試合はいつも日曜日だったので、掛け持ちでプレーすることができた。ロンジャパの試合での思い出は数多くあるが、中でも最初の試合がオックスフォードであったことと、レディング・ウェスト・インディーとの文化交流的な試合は、今でもよく覚えている。

ロンジャパは、1979年に、酔処の渡辺さんを含めた少数のメンバーで創設された。1981年からチームに参加したカツは、厳密には創設メンバーの一人ではないが、年に1、2試合程度プレーするだけだったチームを、定期的に試合を行うチームにしていく上で、カツのエネルギーは欠かせないものだった。この頃を振り返ると、懐かしさと同時に、悲しい思いもこみ上げてくる。SHに宿沢広朗、SOに私、インサイドCTBには、カツ。当時のロンジャパのキャプテンで、1984年からリッチモンドでも私と一緒にプレーした、リコーの石塚武生も含めて、皆すでに亡くなってしまっているからだ。

カツは1983年に日本へ戻り、家族と共にテヘラン、ワシントンへと派遣された後、2000年からロンドンの日本大使館での任務に就いた。この頃には、カツはもうプレーをするほど若くないと思っていたようだが(脚を骨折した話は、後述)、ロンジャパと、キュー・オケージョナルズの熱心なサポーターとして、ラグビーに関わっていた。

この時までに、カツは日本ラグビー協会の国際部門で海外に日本のラグビーを紹介する為に多くの仕事に関わり、日本でのワールドカップ招致にも甚大な貢献を果たした。2019年大会の日本開催が決まった時、元首相で日本ラグビー協会の会長である森喜朗は、真っ先にカツの貢献に思いを寄せたという。

ご存知のように、カツは在英日本大使館勤務中に、国連戦後復興任務の為にイラクを訪れ、2003年11月29日、同僚の井上正盛と運転手と共に、ティクリートで命を落とした。この悲劇が、カツの家族と友人に与えた影響は、計り知れない。翌週、ロンドンにある会員制クラブ、ギャリック・クラブで、当時の日本大使館大使と共に、カツの為に関係者を集めた時のことは、今でも鮮明に覚えている。同じ日に、すぐ近くのトラファルガー広場では、ワールドカップ優勝に輝いたイングランド代表が、パレードを行なっていた。私にとっては、何とも言えない奇遇だった。

暫くの間は悲しみに明け暮れ、これ以上はカツに関係した何かを開催する気にはなれなかったが、この悲劇から2年後の2005年。ロンジャパとキュー・オケージョナルズの仲間で、奥勝彦記念杯を開催することにした。当初は、あまり大きなイベントではなかったのだが、試合に足を運んでくれた当時の日本大使館の野上大使には、非常に感謝している。応援に来る人も少なく、天気も悪いときもあったが、大使は在任中、毎年この記念試合の応援に来てくれた。

その後、この記念試合は規模を広げ、ニューヨーク・ジャパニーズ、オックスフォード・ビンセント・クラブ、オックスフォード大ハートフォートカレッジなどを迎え、リッチモンド・アスレチック・グランド、或いはオックスフォードのイフィー・ロードで試合を行ってきた。2015年9月には、カツが深い繋がりを持つ、早稲田大学とオックスフォード大学で行われた、ワールド・ユニバーシティ・トーナメントの初戦で、奥記念杯を森喜朗元首相に贈呈して貰った。2016年5月には、東京の上井草グランドで行われた、キュー・オケージョナルズと早稲田大学OBチームの試合で、この奥記念杯を贈呈した。

昨年は原点に戻り、12月上旬にリッチモンドで、ロンジャパとキュー・オケージョナルズで記念試合を行い、日本大使館の鶴岡大使にも来て貰った。今年は、オックスフォードのハートフォード・カレッジで、オックスフォードの新旧XVが加わり、三つ巴の戦いをすることになった。

カツとのいい思い出は数え切れないほどあり、どれが最高の思い出だったかを決めるのは難しいが、敢えて選ぶとすれば、三つある。一つ目は、1988年の、オックスフォード大の日本遠征。幸運なことに、カツは日本ラグビー協会側の担当者に任命されており、遠征に同行した私は、楽しい時間を共にすることができた。だが、遠征最後の試合の前日の練習で、試合形式のフルコンタクトの練習に、カツがディフェンスとして借り出された。ちなみに、この時のオックスフォード大の遠征チームには、ワールドカップで優勝したオールブラックスの主将、デビッド・カーク、後に神戸製鋼で伝説的な選手となった、イアン・ウィリアムズの他に、4人のテストマッチ経験者が含まれていた。私は、無理をしないようにと言って止めたにも関わらず、カツは全力でこの練習に参加し、脚を骨折。しかし、カツは翌日の試合に松葉杖をつきながら現れ、遠征チームの見送りに空港まで来てから、脚の手術を行った。カツの精神を表す、典型的な出来事だった。

二つ目は、2000年のロンドンで。この年は、カツと一緒にラグビー観戦、ゴルフ、飲み会で、多くの楽しい時間を共にした。三つ目は、2002年のオックスフォード大の日本遠征で、上井草グランドでの早稲田大との試合の観戦。本当に楽しい時間を共にした。

毎年、この記念試合の度に皆さんに話しているが、カツは私が人生で出会った多くの人たちのなかで、最も素晴らしい人物の一人だ。いつもエネルギーに溢れ、才能に恵まれ、とにかく一緒にいて楽しいヤツだった。ロンドン・ジャパニーズの創設期に大きく貢献しただけでなく、ワールドカップの日本開催の為にも、素晴らしい働きをした。彼の人生を祝福する為に、これからも年に一度、仲間たちで集まって、ラグビーの試合をやろうではないか。